F is for Maurice Flitcroft

Those few of you who regularly read my ABC Wednesday posts will know that there is nothing I like better than an eccentric rogue and this week I give you one of the greatest – Maurice Flitcroft the Phantom of the Open.

Here was a man who took up golf at the age of forty-six and believing that he had mastered the game in a matter of months he posed as a professional to enter the most prestigious tournament in golf and carding a never to be equalled score of 121. Read more ›››

Sunday Round-up

Drag’s Army: Photos of wartime defence forces have emerged of them manning the guns in drag after they were called into action during a panto show at the height of the Blitz.

Spell cheker: Donald Trump would be rubbish at Scrabble so he has come up with Scrabull, a game that any idiot can play as you can see from this Jimmy Kimmel video. Read more ›››

E is for Gertrude Ederle

Gertrude ‘Trudy’ Ederle was an American competition swimmer who earned the nickname of Queen of the Waves when in 1926 she became the first woman to swim the English Channel.

Ederle was born in New York in 1905 the daughter of German immigrants who ran a butcher’s shop in Manhattan. It was her father who first taught to swim in New Jersey where the family owned a summer cottage. Read more ›››

Sunday Round-up

Birthday of the week: The longest-running weekly comic in the world celebrated its 80th birthday this week. And if you were to read a different issue every day it would take you more than ten years to get through them.

Progressive of the week: Tory MP David Campbell Bannerman has demanded that Remainers should be tried under the 1351 Treason Act for ‘excessive EU loyalty’. Read more ›››

D is for Bertrand Dawson

Bertrand Edward Dawson

Bertrand Dawson was a renowned physician, a peer of the realm, a pioneer the National Health Service and also the last person to commit regicide in the UK – or at least the last one that we know of.

Dawson was born in Croydon in 1864, the son of an architect, and graduated with a medical degree from the Royal London Hospital in 1893. Read more ›››

Sunday Round-up

Tongue twister: Eric Morecambe’s jokey football result finally came ture. After penalties in the Scottish League last Sunday we had East Fife 4 – Forfar 5!

No brainer: A parasite that infects the brain could be the secret weapon of business tycoons. Toxoplasma gondii is usually caught from cats increases risk-taking behaviour and might even explain Donald Trump. Read more ›››

C is for Julia Margaret Cameron

Despite discovering photography late in life, Julia Margaret Cameron became the very first celebrity photographer and arguably also the first to treat photography as an art form rather than a science.

Cameron was born Julia Margaret Pattle in Calcutta in 1815 where her father was an official with the East India Company. Her mother was French and her early education took place in France. Read more ›››

Scroll Up