More is Less

Clarkson again I’m afraid:

Every day we are bombarded with surveys that tell us what the nation is thinking. These help shape government and corporate policy. Yet the people who are being questioned — you and me — have no clue what we’re talking about.

We drown these days under the weight of information coming into our homes. We have the internet and rolling television news. We in Britain read more papers than any European country. But the more we’re told, the less we know.

…The inescapable conclusion to all this is that if you have all the facts to, you will see there are two sides to every argument and that both sides are right. So, you can only have an opinion if you have an opinion if you do not have all the facts to hand. This certainly explains the Guardian.

21 October 2001

I can be opinionated as only a TROG can be (see The Reactionary Old Gits), but I also know that when I sound off it’s usually on the basis of the Radio 4 or 5 take on the news, and not on the basis of what I know.

But I’m not so entrenched that I can’t admit that I just don’t know. Take the EU Constitution business. I really don’t know which way I’d vote, assuming we were to be given the chance, because I just don’t understand it, what it is they are aiming to do, or why. I’ve said as much.

As Jezza says:

Someone out there knows, but he’s only ever given three seconds on the evening news to explain. So he comes up with a soundbite that nourishes our quest for knowledge with the effectiveness of a McNugget.

As I stated, more can be less. And I just wish that the media could spend a little more time explaining (both sides) and not trying to cram it into the two minutes before the 9am news.

Nobody’s prefect. If you find any spelling mistakes or other errors in this post, please let me know by highlighting the text and pressing Ctrl+Enter.

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