Werneth Low

Werneth LowI mentioned the other day that I’d taken my camera to Werneth Low, a local country park a few miles from where we live.

There were two reasons for this. First to get some fresh air – I’d started to feel quite lethargic after all this Olympic watching on tv. Ironic, eh?

Second, the rangers have set up a board in the visitor centre inviting people to pin photos of their ‘Moments in Time’ on the low. Sadly, not many had had any moments up there, at least none that they recorded with a camera and I am hoping that a few of mine might encourage others to join in.

For the uninitiated, the word ‘low’ doesn’t signify a lack of height, quite the opposite in fact. Low is a northern word for a hill and the one at Werneth is some 915 feet high offering panoramic views from the Pennines over to Oldham and Manchester and then on to the airport and the Cheshire plain. On a clear day you can see the Welsh mountains to the west.

Artefacts from the Bronze Age have been found on the low and evidence of an Iron Age farmstead from the first millennium BC can also be seen.

Dominating the hilltop now is the cenotaph commemorating the war dead from the nearby towns, but Hyde in particular.

Anyway, having taken my photos, I thought I should share some of them here.

Nobody’s prefect. If you find any spelling mistakes or other errors in this post, please let me know by highlighting the text and pressing Ctrl+Enter.

5 comments… Add yours
  • Roger Green 10th August 2012

    Low is high, and other oxymorons.

    Reply
  • Katherine 11th August 2012

    And ‘downs’ are not down. But ‘gate’ means road, ‘cheap’ means market, and ‘berry’, ‘den’ and don’ means hill. And a hanger is not necessarily associated with an airport.

    Lovely tranquil images, Ian.
    Can hardly wait to get to England again.

    Reply
  • YPEES Pudding 11th August 2012

    What a fine collection of pictures to catch the essence of the place! It’s sometimes in the minutiae that we discover a place.
    ERROR ALERT! You wrote “the was dead” when you meant “the war dead”! Send twelve guineas to Yorkshire Pudding Error Eradication Services.

    Reply
  • Mr Parrot 11th August 2012

    Katherine: The vagaries of the language can be confusion, but I think you’ve got the hang of it better than I have!

    YP: It was was dead but now it isn’t!

    Reply
  • Arctic Fox 12th August 2012

    an inspiring set of pictures….. might have to blow the dust off me camera now and get back on it!!

    Reply

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