It’s an ill-wind

Its an ill windWe had been planning to meet up with our daughter at our friends’ house in Las Vegas in August, but thanks to those lovable, truth-telling Brexiteers and the pound at a 31-year low against the dollar, that idea has hit the buffers, soon to be followed by the rest of the economy.

Mind you, our problems pale in comparison to Jeremy Corbyn’s who seems to have lost his entire shadow cabinet as a result of his dishwater weak support for the remain campaign. And serve the old duffer right.

But as the old adage goes, it’s an ill wind that blows nobody any good. Miss P was sending her £500 contribution to help pay off her student loan which usually amounts to around ¥100,000, but this time was only ¥70,000. Thank you, Messrs Johnson and Farage, for that small mercy.

Nobody’s prefect. If you find any spelling mistakes or other errors in this post, please let me know by highlighting the text and pressing Ctrl+Enter.

6 comments… Add yours
  • Yorkshire Pudding 27th June 2016

    I hate the way they are ganging up on Mr Corbyn. Wasn’t Alan Johnson supposed to be leading Labour’s “Remain” campaign and Hilary Benn was also meant to play a leading role. Now they are both spitting their dummies out of their prams. It’s true that Mr Corbyn can never be our country’s Prime Minister but this is the wrong time to turn on him. He is definitely not to blame for what happened.

    Reply
    • Mr Parrot 28th June 2016

      I heard Alan Johnson speaking several times during the campaign and he was one of the more compelling advocates on the remain side of the argument. Corbyn, on the other hand, was very unconvincing.

      But the current civil war in Labour was inevitable at some point and Brexit was the perfect opportunity for an Ides of March scenario.

      Watch out for Chuka Umunna making a bid. I heard him interviewed yesterday and he steered well clear of the whole Corbyn debacle, a sure sign that he could be one of the runners. He would be a good choice in my opinion.

      Reply
      • Yorkshire Pudding 28th June 2016

        Chuka Umunna? I thought that was a kind of severe food poisoning. The trouble is that it is hard for anybody to lead either Labour or The Tories if they were not advocates of Brexit. By the way, isn’t the idea of Jeremy Hunt leading this great nation utterly repellent? I would rather be led by Muttley from “The Wacky Races”… or a large lump of 2000 year old bog butter.

        Reply
        • Mr Parrot 28th June 2016

          Jeremy Hunt is probably the nicest of a not very nice bunch, but I doubt he has much of chance, possibly for that very reason.

          Chuka Umunna is very much part of the remain camp which I would much prefer to see leading the party than a Gisela Stuart, Kate Hoey or, heaven forfend, Graham Stringer.

          Reply
  • Steve 28th June 2016

    Corbyn was a controversial choice for leader from the beginning, wasn’t he? I suppose this is a chance for some of his long-standing opponents to raise their voices once again. I generally don’t mind the guy’s politics (to the extent I understand them) but I was disappointed he didn’t come out more strongly in favor of Remain.

    Reply
    • Mr Parrot 28th June 2016

      Corbyn certainly wasn’t MPs’ first choice, but as elected by the rank and file membership, many of whom joined the party specifically to elect a far left candidate. I suspect that he is genuine and very much a conviction politician, not necessarily the qualities that make for a good leader!

      Reply

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