A Pint of Cooking

yorkshire-puddingThey say that travel broadens the mind, although I’m not entirely sure who ‘they’ are. Perhaps the narrow-minded whose outlook needs to put on a few pounds.

While on Paxos, we toyed with the idea of a trip to the southern bit of the archipelago known as Antipaxos, home to 150 people and endless viniculture dedicated to the production of the ‘famous Antipaxos wines’.

We forewent that pleasure on the grounds that being taken by boat and dumped on a tiny island for six hours seemed a little risky had we then decided that it wasn’t where we wanted to spend a chunk of our holiday.

But the idea of such a place producing so much fine wine was intriguing. Most of the wines we found were mostly packaged in the sort of plastic bottles I normally associate with cooking oil. Or apple juice, as Mrs P thought on our first day, pouring a large glass from the welcome pack, only to choke on a mouthful of vino.

We tried a few different vintages while we were away, although none really impressed. The plastic bottles didn’t help, I suppose, and we never did find any of the famous Antipaxios wine no matter how hard we looked. I suspect those Antipaxiots keep it all to themselves, either that or Angela Merkel demands the lot as part of the Greek bail-out deal.

There were a few bottles that we tipped down the sink. They didn’t say ‘retsina’ on the label, but they might as well have done. They had that rough quality that I normally associate with cooking sherry and, as things do, it reminded me of the ITV series of the 1970s ‘Oh no, it’s Selwyn Froggitt’ and his catchphrase of ‘a pint of cooking and a bag of nuts’.

Serious bit: The comedy series ran for four years and was written by Roy Clarke who also created the better remembered  Last of the Summer Wine, Keeping Up Appearances and Open All Hours, all big hits for the BBC while ITV’s Selwyn Froggitt (equally entertaining) is all but forgotten.

Curious bit: Although the star of the programme used Bill Maynard as his stage name, the part of Selwyn Froggitt was actually played by none other than our very own Yorkshire Pudding without his usual wig. You can see YP with his habitual Times Literary Supplement in series one below.

Nobody’s prefect. If you find any spelling mistakes or other errors in this post, please let me know by highlighting the text and pressing Ctrl+Enter.

7 comments… Add yours
  • Yorkshire Pudding 25th October 2016

    OH YES IT’S YORKSHIRE PUDDING!

    Bill Maynard, or to give him his proper name – Walter Frederick George Williams was a fake Yorkshireman. Like me, he was born on October 8th. Alan Plater, the writer, was also not a Yorkshireman even though, like me, he supported Hull City. Consequently, like me, he must have had to endure a lot of misery over the years… until we first reached the promised land in 2008. He died in 2010.

    Reply
  • Trevor Rowley 25th October 2016

    …and to bring us back to Cheshire, the mother in that clip of video from the Selwyn Froggitt TV series, was Megs Kenkins who was born in Birkenhead. She featured in one of my favourite films, the Pinewood thriller,”Green For Danger” (1946), which starred Alastair Sim and Trevor Howard. Yorkshire – where’s that?

    Reply
    • Yorkshire Pudding 25th October 2016

      Yorkshire is a historic county in northern England. It’s known for its Roman and Viking heritage, as well as its Norman castles, medieval abbeys, Industrial Revolution-era cities and three national parks. The county town of York, founded by the Romans, is home to 13th-century cathedral York Minster, Tudor houses and medieval walls. The interactive Jorvik Viking Centre recalls the area’s 9th-century Norse occupation.

      Reply
      • Mr Parrot 26th October 2016

        The thing about Yorkshiremen is that the buggers can’t act. ‘Our Maurice” was another scouse, Taff was… well a taff and Ray Mort was Lancastrian. I grant you that the idea was the creation of a Yorkist, but as you rightly point out, it took an outlander to provide the comic touches.

        Reply
        • Yorkshire Pudding 26th October 2016

          Tom Courtenay and Dame Judi Dench spring to mind.

          Reply
          • Mr Parrot 26th October 2016

            I didn’t know that Tom and Judi were in Selwyn Froggitt, nor that they used to have a comedy double act.

            Reply
    • Trevor Rowley 26th October 2016

      My error, should read Jenkins.

      Reply

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