Sunday Round-up

What a bust: Footballing heartthrob Cristiano Ronaldo didn't look quite so handsome when a sculpture of him was unveiled at the ceremony at Madeira airport which has been named after him. I think it looks like Niall Quinn.

Speaking of busts: Sculptor David Bradley has carved a statue of the pregnant Beyonce entirely out of cheese as part of the East Village's Wine and Cheese Festival. Read more ›››

Solomon Linda is responsible for one of the most instantly recognised songs heard across the world and yet despite this, he earned little from the composition and was to die unrecognised and in poverty.

Linda was born in 1909 on a labour reserve near Ladysmith in Natal, South Africa. He grew up in the traditions of amahubo and izingoma zomshado music, or wedding songs. Read more ›››

Sunday Round-up

Blistering barnacles: The remain faction has recruited Tintin to their cause by using an illustration from The Crab with the Golden Claws to illustrate the self-destructive nature of Brexit and it now hangs on the wall of the EU negotiating team.

And speaking of Brexit, Alistair Campbell has returned to journalism as editor-at-large for the New European, the newspaper for the 48%. Read more ›››

The British army has long relied on soldiers and units from its former empire and never more so than in the First World War when Khudadad Khan became the first Asian and Muslim to be awarded the Victoria Cross, the highest award for bravery.

Khan was born in Chakwal in the Punjab province of India in 1888, now the Potohar region of Pakistan, and joined the 129th Duke of Connaught's Own Baluchis as a sepoy. Read more ›››

Sunday Round-up

Posing parrot: Before anyone asks the obvious question, I swear it wasn't me who dressed as a parrot to help sell a house in Bolton.

Funny money: Scientists have created an ultrasecure banknote that uses quantum mechanics and light instead of paper or plastic. It is meant to be impossible to counterfeit but no sooner had the scientists invented than they discovered that it could. Read more ›››

I usually know at least the basic details of the lives of my ABC Wednesday subjects – when and where they were born, their family life etc – but in the case of James Julian I know nothing at all except that he was the inventor of a most bizarre means of execution, the Julian Gallows.

In the late 19th century, America was obsessed with finding a ‘humane’ means of execution and so it was that in 1892 Julian invented his gallows. Read more ›››

Sunday Round-up

Toast master: A brainless neo-Nazi drug dealer brought the weight of German law enforcement down upon himself after posting pictures of toast featuring images of Adolf Hitler on Facebook. When police went to arrest him they also discovered a stash of crystal meth and marijuana.

In the pink: Residents of Onoway in Canada were shocked when the town's tap water turned bright pink. Read more ›››

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