Posts tagged: H

H is for Matthew Henson

Matthew Henson was the first African-American arctic explorer and the first person to reach the Geographic North Pole.

He was born Matthew Alexander Henson in Maryland in 1866, the son of two freeborn black sharecroppers. His mother died when he was young and his father a few years later and aged eleven Henson left home. Read more ›››

We tend to think of abstract art as a relatively recent phenomenon, something sprung from the psychedelia of the 1960s and yet one woman was a hundred years ahead of her time, the spiritualist artist Georgiana Houghton.

Houghton was born in Las Palmas, Gran Canaria, in 1814, the seventh of twelve children of the merchant George Houghton and the family variously lived in London and Madeira, as well as the Canary Islands. Read more ›››

Jane Haining was a Christian missionary who worked with Jewish communities in Eastern Europe in the 1930s and 40s who in 2010 was posthumously named a British Hero of the Holocaust by the British Government.

She was born in Dunscore, Scotland, in 1897 the daughter of Thomas and Jane Haining. Her mother died when Jane was just five-years-old and as she grew she took on the role of caring for the family. Read more ›››

Anyone who has read The Man Who Would Be King by Rudyard Kipling might think it typical of British Imperialism, but it seems that the inspiration for the story was, in fact, an American, Josiah Harlan.

Harlan was born in Chester County, Pennsylvania, in 1799, the son of a prosperous Quaker family. He was one of nine children of Joshua Harlan, a merchant broker in Philadelphia. Read more ›››

Ronnie Hazlehurst is the man behind the theme tunes for many of the BBC’s best loved sitcoms and include him for my ABC gallery not just because he fits the letter H, but also for other personal reasons.

For a starters, he was born in my home town of Dukinfield in 1928, the son of a railway worker and a piano teacher. Read more ›››

George Hanger

If ever a man was a typical product of his times it would be the soldier, adventurer, rake and dandy George Hanger.

Born in Gloucestershire in 1751, Hanger was the son of a country squire who dabbled in politics and who managed to land himself the title of Baron Coleraine even though his claim was but a distant one. Read more ›››

William Patrick Hitler

Hitler was a trending name in the 1930s (Adolf was Time Magazine Man of the Year in 1939) but it had become #hated by the early 1940s and unsurprisingly those with a family connection became less proud of their surname.

One such was William Patrick Hitler (aka Willy), a nephew of Adolf, who was living in America when that country entered World War II… Read more ›››

Olivér Halassy

One of the stand out points of London 2012 was Oscar Pistorius competing against able-bodied athletes, but he was by no means the first Olympian with a physical disability.

One such was Olivér Halassy, the Hungarian water polo player and freestyle swimmer who competed successfully in three Olympics from 1928 to 1936 despite having only one leg. Read more ›››

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