Posts tagged: V

Unusually my post this week is not about an individual, but rather a group of people who together became known as the Veronica Mutineers.

The Veronica in question was a three-masted wooden barque built in 1879 and by 1902 it was still being used as a cargo ship despite the competition from the much faster steamships. Read more ›››

Espionage can be a dirty business of duplicity, double-crossing and general skullduggery but one case that stands out is that of Erwin Van Haarlem also known as the spy with no name.

His story begins in occupied Europe in 1944 when Johanna Van Haarlem gave birth to her son Erwin in the Netherlands. His father was a Polish Nazi who was killed soon after in the fighting around Caen. Read more ›››

In the wilds of North Yorkshire you will find Newby Hall, a place of fun and frolics for all the family, but it is also home to the church of Christ the Consoler, a permanent memorial to a murdered son, Frederick Vyner.

The young man was the son of the widowed Lady Mary Vyner and they were a well-connected family, her daughter, Henrietta, being married to the Earl de Grey, a prominent member of Gladstone’s Liberal government and later Viceroy of India. Read more ›››

V is for Vimto

A deviation from my normal ABC Wednesday format this week as I write about a something, rather than a someone. And that something is Vimto which I couldn’t resist as our V week coincides sweetly with the first week of Ramadan.

For those who have never come across Vimto before, it is a soft drink, or cordial, made from white grapes, raspberries and blackberries, flavoured with a secret mix of herbs and spices. Read more ›››

Otto Monsson

Unusually my post this week is not about an individual, but rather a group of people who together became known as the Veronica Mutineers.

The Veronica in question was a three-masted wooden barque built in 1879 and by 1902 it was still being used as a cargo ship despite the competition from the much faster steam ships. Read more ›››

Martin Van Butchell

Martin Van Butchell was one of the pioneers of high society cosmetic dentistry, but whose greatest claim to fame if for keeping the embalmed body of his deceased wife on display in his home.

Born in 1775, Van Butchell originally studied medicine under the celebrated physicians, John and William Hunter, but chose instead to practice dentistry, and very successfully too. Read more ›››

Anthropometrics

Eugène François Vidocq was the 18th century duellist, thief, forger, soldier and womaniser who is regarded as the father of modern criminology and an inspiration for the likes of Victor Hugo and Alexander Dumas and for the world’s first detective story.

Vidocq was born in 1775 in Arras in northern France, the third child of the wealthy baker and corn dealer Nicolas Joseph François Vidocq. Read more ›››

Vicki Van Meter

Vicki Van Meter is the youngest female pilot to have made a transatlantic flight when she was aged twelve, but despite a promising future before her, she was to die by her own hand when she was just 26.

Van Meter was born in Meadville, Pennsylvania in 1982 and became hooked on the idea of flying and space travel when NASA visited her junior school. Read more ›››

Scroll Up