Sunday Round-up

My round-up of news, events and stuff and nonsense that caught my eye this week.
If it’s news to me, it must be news to you!
Alternative Music Blueprint

Music Charts

A UK-based design shop has made it easier to visualise the development of different genres of popular music by creating ‘blueprints’ of acid house, alternative, hip-hop and electronic music.

Tasty Trees

The holiday has fizzled out and we are faced with that familiar problem – how to dispose of the Christmas tree? One option is to eat it.

Cool Idea

Discovered beneath the streets of London is an ice house built in the 1780s where wealthy Georgians would store their supplies of ice from Norway.

Speaking of history

The first synagogue to be built in Washington DC was moved on enormous wheels to what will be the location of the Capital Jewish Museum.

Refugees

I’m not usually a great lover of poetry but it is well worth clicking and reading the verse on the right by Brian Bilston. (I’m talking to you, Messrs Trump and Javid)

Dressing Down

Paris’s first nude restaurant is to close in February due to a lack the bare necessity that all restaurants rely on: customers.

Anti-toastie Behaviour

Bristol council has taken extreme measures to stop anti-social behaviour – by banning the sale of cheese toasties.

Stress Test

The optical illusion on the left has been doing the rounds with the claim that the faster you see the movement, the more stressed you must be. Not true according to Snopes.com.

Cuddle-up

But if you are feeling stressed then seek out the services of certified cuddlist Robin Marie for a session of therapeutic cuddling.

Brief Lives

Children’s author John Burningham; wildlife artist Greg Poole; Hollies bassist Eric Haydock; Sr Seuss’ widow and keeper of his flame Audrey Geisel and; weather and news presenter Diane Oxberry a familiar friendly face where I live.

Nobody’s prefect. If you find any spelling mistakes or other errors in this post, please let me know by highlighting the text and pressing Ctrl+Enter.

3 comments… Add yours
  • Yorkshire Pudding 13th January 2019

    I didn’t know that Eric Haydock had died. When The Hollies first appeared, I loved the melodies they made. Thanks for sharing the clever and powerful poem crafted by Brian Bilston. Unlike you, I have always been a great lover of poetry. It is in my bones.

    Reply
  • Trevor Rowley 15th January 2019

    I was saddened to hear of the death of Eric Haydock. To me, he seemed to be the one that was left behind by The Hollies’ fame and fortune. In photographs he was always left at the back, the camera rarely focused on him. In interviews (see You Tube), it is mostly Messrs Nash and Clarke who dominate the dialogue and any reference to Eric is somewhat fleeting. Perhaps he preferred it that way – I read somewhere that all he wanted to do was play and then go home. One reason given for him leaving the group at the height of their success was that he had a dispute with their management who he had accused of handling their financial affairs incorrectly (deception, fraud, who knows?). Also, it was said that he had had enough of constant travelling and leaving his new wife behind. The latter (the constant travelling) appears to be the interpretation that the other bandmates prefer to recognise – presumably not wanting to raise legal issues with their then management.

    Although he helped form a new group (Eric Haydock’s Rockhouse) after he left The Hollies, there was no more chart success for him and the venture was shortlived.

    About twenty years ago, he opened a music shop in Stalybridge (Cheshire). I think I went in just the once. He was said to be very approachable and certainly not “star struck.”

    A year or two ago, along with various members of The Hollies, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Yet again, he got pushed to the back and when he was allowed to speak, Graham Nash “takes the mickey” when he gets tongue-tied. Noticeably, Messrs Elliott and Hicks, who still perform under the name of The Hollies, weren’t at the event. I rather suspect that their feelings for Mr Nash are not very flavoursome – I find him quite tedious.

    God bless you Eric, you brough a lot of colour into into the drab, dull Manchester of the Swinging Sixties.

    Reply
  • Roger Green 16th January 2019

    I was sad about Mrs. Seuss, er, Mrs. Geisel

    Reply

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