Posts tagged: T

T is for John Tarrant

The Ghost Runner

John Tarrant was possibly the greatest athlete of his generation who could break long-distance running records at will and yet his achievements were never acknowledged because of the rules governing amateurism.

Born in 1932 in Shepherd’s Bush, London, Tarrant was first abandoned by his father and then his mother died of TB leaving her son to the not so tender mercies of a children’s home. Read more ›››

T is for Ignáz Trebitsch-Lincoln

Ignáz Trebitsch-Lincoln

Ignaz Trebitsch-Lincoln was one of the most remarkable adventurers, scoundrels and fraudsters of the 20th century or any other century come to that.

At times in his life, he was an actor, arms dealers, oil speculator, British Liberal MP, vicar and a German spy. At prayer he moved from Judaism to Presbyterianism, ending up as a Buddhist abbot monk. And along the way, he possibly saved the life of Adolf Hitler. Read more ›››

T is for Gerda Taro

The recently published biography of war correspondent Marie Colvin illustrates the dangers and bravery of this peculiar profession and the very first woman on the frontline was photojournalist Gerda Taro.

Taro was born Gerta Pohorylle in Stuttgart in 1910 to a middle-class Jewish family. She would later change her name to overcome the increasing intolerance of Jews in Europe. Read more ›››

T is for Geoffrey Tandy

History can often turn on the simplest of mistakes and there is probably no finer example than Geoffrey Tandy who was accidentally in the right place to help crack the Enigma Code and so bring about the end of World War Two.

When the British were casting around to create a team of appropriately qualified experts for the super-secret Bletchley Park, someone recruited Tandy. Read more ›››

T is for Annie Edson Taylor

Annie Edson Taylor was a remarkable woman. At an age when most people would think about putting their feet up and taking it easy, she decided that she would become the very first person to go over Niagara Falls in a barrel.

She was born Annie Edson in Auburn, New York, in 1838, one of the eight children of flour mill owner Merrick Edson. He died when she was eight but the money he left meant supported the family. Read more ›››

T is for George Francis Train

George Francis Train was an American entrepreneur, political activist and as an eccentric globetrotter possibly the inspiration for Jules Verne’s Around the World in Eighty Days.

Train was born in Boston in 1829, the son of Oliver Train, but both his parents and his three sisters died in a yellow fever epidemic in New Orleans when he was just four years old. Read more ›››

T is for Walter Tull

Wars often bring about social change, or at least mark the start of a change in attitudes, and the First World War brought many, including the first black officer in the British army – Walter Daniel John Tull.

Tull was born in Folkestone, Kent, in 1888, the son of Daniel Tull, a Barbadian carpenter, and English-born Alice Palmer. His grandfather had been a slave in Barbados. Read more ›››

T is for Susan Travers

Susan Travers was an Englishwoman from a wealthy, privileged background who became a heroine of World War Two and the only woman to join the famed French Foreign Legion.

Travers was born in London in 1909, the daughter of Francis Eaton Travers, an admiral in the Royal Navy and wealthy heiress Eleanor Catherine Turnbull. Read more ›››